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Alberta reports possible case of syndrome linked to COVID-19

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MISC), seems to develop several weeks to a month after children and adolescents are infected with the coronavirus.
Dr. Deena Hinshaw May 12
Alberta's Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Deena Hinshaw provides a COVID-19 update on Tuesday, May 12. PHOTO: Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta

On Wednesday, the Alberta government reported a possible case of an inflammatory condition in children suspected to be linked to COVID-19.

Alberta chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw said Wednesday afternoon the condition, called multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MISC), seems to develop several weeks to a month after children and adolescents are infected with COVID-19.

MISC involves inflammation of multiple organs including the heart, kidneys, blood vessels and nervous system. Fever is a key feature, but other symptoms include rash, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain. The syndrome is treatable with steroids.

“This new condition might be scary for parents – I worry for my kids too. It is important to remember that this condition appears to be rare and it is treatable. However, it is a reminder that we continue to learn new things about this virus, and we must be cautious in our relaunch,” Hinshaw said.

There are currently 679 active cases of Albertans who have COVID-19. This is the fewest number of cases since March. There are 30 people hospitalized and four people in ICU with the virus. The province has reported 25 new cases of the virus.

Two more people have died from COVID-19, bringing the current death toll to 149. Hinshaw said this is one-and-a-half times higher than the highest annual influenza death count in the last five years.

During the peak in global COVID-19 deaths in April, the number of weekly deaths being reported was higher than lung cancer road injuries, diabetes or suicide.

“Even with unprecedented efforts to stop spread, cumulative global death count so far this year is higher than what we would expect for year-to-date global deaths from malaria or homicides.” Dr. Hinshaw said.




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